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Deported without Justice: Discrimination in the identification of foreign born victims of human trafficking

Introduction

Franciscans International (FI) and the Global Alliance against Traffic in Women (GAATW) welcome the report of the Special Rapporteur on trafficking in persons, especially women and children, on the right to an effective remedy for trafficked persons.


The need to redress wrongs and provide remedies to victims of crimes is a fundamental legal principle, and a well-established rule of international human rights law[1] with obligations and responsibilities widely articulated in international human rights treaties[2] and soft law[3]. Further, substantial dedicated anti-trafficking laws and policies have been adopted in increasing numbers of countries worldwide, many of which consider the need to provide remedies to victims of trafficking.

 

Joint written statement submitted by Amnesty International a non-governmental organization with special consultative status, the Global Alliance against Traffic in Women (GAATW) and Franciscans International (FI) non-governmental organizations with special consultative status

 

SECTION V

 

Title: An urgent need for a victim-centered monitoring mechanism to the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organised Crime (UNTOC) to combat human trafficking.

 

SECTION VI

 

Text:

 

Amnesty International, The Global Alliance against Traffic in Women (GAATW) and Franciscans International welcome the report of the Special Rapporteur on trafficking in persons, especially women and children, in particular her timely focus on coordination and cooperation mechanisms to address trafficking. Furthermore, we welcome the planned Panel on Trafficking, enabling interaction between States and trafficked persons, particularly “with a view to reinforcing the centrality of their human rights and needs, and taking into account their recommendations when devising actions to combat human trafficking” (Decision 13/117).

 

SECOND DRAFT

Mme President, Distinguished Chairman, Distinguished Delegates, fellow members of civil society, Ladies and Gentlemen,

NGOs working with and on behalf of those affected by issues covered by the UN Convention against Transnational Organised Crime and the Protocols thereto (UNTOC), including trafficked persons, migrants and those affected by the illicit trade in firearms, jointly mark the 10th Anniversary of this landmark convention. The Convention and most of its protocols have now been widely ratified and many countries have developed relevant national legislation. However, we are concerned that momentum to implement the Convention and its protocols is waning and believe that in order to achieve UNTOC’s aims there is a pressing need to reinvigorate this treaty by assessing successes and limitations in its implementation:

 

In reference to transnational organised crime, illegal assets belonging to organized criminal groups must be confiscated and redistributed through community projects and activities. Further, endemic official corruption, which reinforces and promotes links between criminal activities such as terrorism and drug trafficking, must be acknowledged and addressed to reduce such crimes. In the field of emerging crimes, particularly cyber crime, we urge all States to promote a culture of cyber security in close cooperation with civil society and the private sector, and stress that in doing so particular attention must be paid to avoid measures which discriminate against vulnerable groups especially migrants.

Joint written statement submitted by Franciscans International, a non-governmental organization in general consultative status, the Global Alliance against Traffic in Women, (GAATW) and Anti-Slavery International, nongovernmental organisations in special consultative status

 [23 August 2010]

The “Protection Gap”: diplomatic immunity and domestic workers

Introduction

The Global Alliance against Traffic in Women, Franciscan’s International and Anti-Slavery International welcome the Special Rapporteur on Contemporary Forms of Slavery’s (SR CFS) report2 on Domestic Servitude and her ongoing commitment to dialogue with civil society.

Domestic servitude has received increasing international attention in recent years. At its301st session, March 2008, the ILO Governing Body agreed to begin discussions on setting labour standards to address the treatment of domestic workers in employment worldwide. Similarly, at its 11th session, September 2009, the Committee on Migrant Workers focused on domestic work, and is in the process of developing a General Comment on the issue for discussion at its 12th session.

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