Location:  Bangkok, full-time

About us:

The Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women (GAATW) is a progressive think-tank, and cutting-edge Alliance committed to work for changes in the political, economic, social and legal systems and structures which contribute to the persistence of trafficking in persons and other human rights violations in the context of migratory movements for diverse purposes, including security of labour and livelihood.

We promote a human rights approach in working towards our mission to defend the rights and safety of all migrants and their families against the threats of an increasingly globalised and informal labour market.

We have member organisations based in different parts of the world. The International Secretariat (GAATW-IS) is based in Bangkok, Thailand, and has a small and very committed team of people. The GAATW-IS currently works on themes of Access to Justice, Accountability and Power in Migration and Work. We also publish a bi-annual peer reviewed journal, the Anti-Trafficking Review. While member organisations work with women, children and men, GAATW-IS has always focussed on the rights of adult women in the context of labour migration.

For more information, please see: www.gaatw.org

About the Research and Training Programme of GAATW-IS:

GAATW-IS has always had a vibrant Research and Training Programme. All staff carry out some desk research and as they gain experience they also facilitate different kinds of training workshops for members and partners. Additionally, the IS also takes help from external resource persons for some of its research and training work. While much of our work has research and training components, sometimes we also take up projects that focus exclusively on research and/or training. Most of our researches are carried out in conjunction with members and partners. GAATW primarily has employed Feminist Participatory Action Research (FPAR) methodologies, which prioritise women’s lived experiences and spark action for change through collective analysis. Our training workshops have focussed on conceptual clarity on trafficking and forced labour, linkages of trafficking with migration, smuggling, gender and globalisation, safe migration and FPAR methodologies.

Currently, we are nearing the completion of a multi-country research project on sex workers’ rights groups and anti-trafficking initiatives. There are other projects with strong research components. A new multi-country FPAR project will start in a couple of months that will require providing research methodology trainings and on-going support to the partners as well as writing up the research outputs.

The aim of the FPAR project is to create an opportunity for participating NGOs from South and Southeast Asia to understand the issues of gender, mobility, labour, violence and trafficking from the perspectives of migrant women themselves; build a collective analysis of the broader socio-economic and political context and how it affects women’s mobility and complex decision-making processes; and create an evidence base to promote a feminist agenda for safe and secure mobility on the national, regional and international level that works for women. 

The research will focus on the factors that shape women’s mobility and migration experiences and the strategies that women use to mitigate them. Based on the learnings from the research, we will prepare briefing papers and other advocacy materials that will be used at national, regional and international forums to advocate for the inclusion of women’s rights and interests in policies that affect their mobility. Partners will identify additional actions on the local level.

What we expect from you:

  • Good knowledge and critical understanding of migration and human trafficking and their intersections with gender, class and race in South and Southeast Asia
  • Experience with qualitative research, especially FPAR, and training of NGOs, particularly in Asia
  • Excellent networking and mentoring skills and ability to communicate with different types of stakeholders
  • Excellent command of the English language, both oral and written, and demonstrated ability to prepare advocacy materials 

Key Tasks:

  • Plan the FPAR project in conjunction with a core team within GAATW, including the various workshops with the partners to plan the research, the methodology training and the data analysis workshop
  • Develop and deliver a training in Feminist Participatory Action Research methodology for the partner NGOs;
  • Maintain regular contact with the partner NGOs and provide guidance and supervision during the FPAR research phase as needed;
  • Visit (some of) the countries of the national researches to liaise with local organisations as needed to provide on-location support;
  • Coordinate the production of country reports and develop an executive summary and recommendations in consultation with project partners;
  • Develop briefing papers and other materials, based on the research findings, to be used for advocacy at national and international levels;
  • Based on the research outcomes, identify further actions that can be developed for the benefit of migrant women;
  • Support other colleagues in planning their research and training work;
  • Work with the core team within GAATW to develop new projects to address relevant issues.

Required Skills and Experience:

  • Post-graduate degree in social sciences including women’s studies, political science, history sociology and law;
  • In-depth knowledge and critical understanding of gender, migration, labour and human trafficking from a human rights perspective;
  • At least three years of experience in conducting qualitative research, especially FPAR, and synthesising information from a variety of sources;
  • Excellent written and oral communications skills and a high level of competence in English, with the ability to write papers and reports;
  • Experience in building linkages with relevant civil society organisations and social movements;
  • Good interpersonal skills, with ability to network in a multi-cultural environment and sensitivity to issues of gender, race and class.

Competencies:

  • Ability to analyse, research and/or abridge diverse information from varied sources;
  • Ability to work strategically and respectfully with diverse stakeholders towards a key objective, i.e. familiarity with working effectively with both government representatives as well as grassroots organisations;
  • Accountability and the ability to deliver on agreed tasks to a high standard;
  • Ability to work independently and to meet deadlines;
  • Willingness to travel, as required.

 

Conditions: 
Contract: This is a full-time position with a two-year contract.

Remuneration: Commensurate with experience, tentatively 60 000 – 70 000 THB (1800-2000 USD) per month with additional benefits such as housing allowance, relocation allowance, social security, medical fund etc.

Note: Depending on the candidate’s experience, we can consider hiring a freelancer with some modification of the tasks.

Recruitment Process:
Deadline for receiving applications: 1 August 2017
Shortlisted Candidates will be notified by 7 August 2017 
Interviews and written exam will be conducted between 8 and 15 August 2017

Position to start: latest by 1 October 2017

How to apply:

Please send your application with the subject line Research and Training Officer by email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 1 August 2017. In your application, please include a CV, a writing sample, names of two referees who can be contacted at a later stage and a cover letter detailing why you are interested in this position and how your experience makes you a suitable candidate. Only short-listed candidates will be contacted.

 

Location:  GAATW-International Secretariat (Bangkok, Thailand) with significant travel to different countries

About us:

The Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women (GAATW) is a progressive think-tank, and cutting-edge Alliance committed to work for changes in the political, economic, social and legal systems and structures which contribute to the persistence of trafficking in persons and other human rights violations in the context of migratory movements for diverse purposes, including security of labour and livelihood.

We promote a human rights approach in working towards our mission to defend the rights and safety of all migrants and their families against the threats of an increasingly globalised and informal labour market.

We have member organisations based in different parts of the world. The International Secretariat (GAATW-IS) is based in Bangkok, Thailand, and has a small and very committed team of people. The GAATW-IS currently works on themes of Access to Justice, Accountability and Power in Migration and Work. We also publish a bi-annual peer reviewed journal, the Anti-Trafficking Review. While member organisations work with women, children and men, GAATW-IS has always focussed on the rights of adult women in the context of labour migration.

For more information, please see: www.gaatw.org

GAATW-IS’ Work in Southeast Asia: GAATW currently has 17 member organisations in six Southeast Asian countries. Through a few thematic projects we have focussed on a range of issues around human trafficking and migration in this region. Our work has included action research on migrant workers’ and trafficked persons’ access to justice, and exploring how self-organising among sex workers has enabled them to address exploitation and abuse. Typically, our projects carry out research in collaboration with member and partner organisations with a view to steer advocacy at national, regional and international level. GAATW-IS has just started a new project that aims to reduce trafficking in persons in Asia through a more effective regional response that addresses human trafficking risks, provides appropriate responses that transcend borders, and protects the rights of vulnerable and trafficked persons. As part of this project we will be working in conjunction with several members and partners in the ASEAN region to steer evidence based advocacy, including policy advocacy.

The selected candidate’s work will focus on the above mentioned project and other organisational tasks at the IS.

Key Responsibilities:

  • Oversee the implementation of the project activities as per the project agreement;
  • Coordinate research activities with research institutions and research advisors and provide mentoring support to external researchers;
  • Carry out desk and field research on trafficking and related topics, prepare reports as well as other dissemination documents;
  • Coordinate and support strategic CSO interventions in regional advocacy arenas on women’s rights, human trafficking, migration and labour rights;
  • Maintain communication with the donor and prepare reports in compliance with the project agreement;
  • Organise and participate in project meetings;
  • Work closely with the Communications and Advocacy Team to develop common advocacy positions and collaborative activities with members and CSO partners.

Required Knowledge and Experience:

  • Post-graduate degree in social sciences including women’s studies, political science, sociology and law;
  • Critical understanding of the current labour migration regime in Southeast Asia and the way it impacts on the rights of all workers, especially women migrant workers;
  • At least three years of experience in managing projects at regional level;
  • Knowledge of ASEAN instruments, including the Anti-Trafficking Convention and experience with engaging in ASEAN platforms;
  • Experience with working with CSOs and international agencies in the region;
  • Excellent networking skills and experience of facilitating multi-disciplinary steering groups and networks;  
  • Excellent command of the English language, both oral and written;
  • Ability to communicate well in one or two ASEAN languages is an advantage.

Competencies:

  • Ability to analyse, research and/or abridge diverse information from varied sources;
  • Ability to work strategically and respectfully with diverse stakeholders towards a key objective, i.e. familiarity with working effectively with both government representatives as well as civil society organisations;
  • Accountability and the ability to deliver on agreed tasks to a high standard;
  • Ability to work independently and to meet deadlines;
  • Ability to work in a multicultural environment and with people from a diversity of regions, professional backgrounds and levels of authority;
  • Willingness to travel, as required. 

Term, Remuneration and Benefits

Duration: Two-year contract (six months’ probation period), with the possibility of extension.

Monthly Salary: Commensurate with qualifications and work experience in the relevant field, in the range of THB 50 000-60 000 (approx. USD 1,500-1800) per month, and additional benefits, such as contributions to employee provident fund, house rent allowance, medical benefits, relocation allowance and reimbursement of one-way air fare to take up the position in Bangkok, if relocating to Bangkok.

Recruitment Process

Deadline for receiving applications: 1 August 2017

Shortlisted candidates will be notified by 15 August 2017 

Interviews and written exam will be conducted tentatively in the week of 28 August.

Position to start: latest by 1 November 2017

How to apply

Please send your application (CV, a writing sample, names of two referees who can be contacted at a later stage and a cover letter detailing why you are interested in this position and how your experience makes you a suitable candidate) with the subject line Programme Officer Southeast Asia by email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 1 August 2017. Only short-listed candidates will be contacted. 

 

GAATW Position Paper MigrantRightsAreHumanRights GlobalCompact.06

Migrants’ Rights are Human Rights: The basis of the Global Compact on migration

Global Compact for safe, orderly and regular migration: Thematic consultation on the human rights of all migrants, social inclusion, cohesion, and all forms of discrimination, including racism, xenophobia and intolerance, 8 and 9 May 2017, Geneva

Position paper by the Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women (GAATW)


Commit to realising the human rights of all migrants

The Global Compact should:                                                                 

  • Affirm and re-commit to respecting, protecting and fulfilling the human rights of migrants without discrimination and across the international human rights framework of civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights
  • Urge states who have not yet done so to ratify and implement all international and regional human rights instruments, withdraw any reservations, and reaffirm in policy and practice the human rights of all migrants, regardless of their migratory status. (read more)

Enabling Access to Justice: A CSO Perspective on the Challenges of Realising the Rights of South Asian Migrants in the Middle East

SAMEA2JCover smallIn 2015-2016, the GAATW International Secretariat undertook a project called the ‘South Asia – Middle East Access to Justice Project’ (SAME A2J Project) as part of a larger initiative, ‘Addressing Labour Trafficking of South Asian Migrant Workers in the Middle East.’ The objective of the SAME A2J Project was to identify cases in which migrant workers who had travelled to the Middle East as temporary labour migrants were trafficked, and to identify the barriers those workers faced accessing justice. The rationale for the project was a perception within GAATW that migrant workers from South Asia who were coerced, defrauded or deceived into situations of severe exploitation were rarely treated as trafficked persons and rarely received an adequate remedy.

A total of thirteen partner organisations from seven countries (Bangladesh, India, Jordan, Lebanon, Kuwait, Nepal and Sri Lanka) participated in the project. This report aims to capture one area of learning that emerged from the project: the barriers that project partners experience or observe when supporting migrant workers to access justice. Although specific barriers to justice may differ between countries, and even regions within countries, project partners identified many in common. These include legal and operational barriers, practical barriers, social and cultural barriers, as well as barriers within the organisations assisting migrant workers. 

The report concludes with reflections on the lessons learnt by the GAATW about the obstacles to justice for migrant workers, but also for organisations seeking to assist migrant workers and the effort required to overcome those barriers. It is not intended to dissuade civil society organisations or legal service providers from working to improve access to justice for migrant workers, but rather to highlight the complexity of human trafficking, and the many challenges along the road to justice.

Download the report

Perspectives on and Access to Justice among Cambodian Migrant Workers in Thailand 

No Trust, Few Options

A2JCamb Thai1

Cambodian migrant workers in Thailand usually do not try to pursue justice after rights violations due to a lack of trust in the police and courts, research conducted by GAATW and partners found.

Lack of information about labour and migration laws and regulations was one factor among those interviewed that made them vulnerable to exploitation and human trafficking. When violations occurred they did not seek justice, either because they are undocumented and believe that this makes them ineligible for justice mechanisms or because they don’t believe they will receive a fair outcome against a Thai employer. Perceptions of what is just or fair among the migrant workers were often based on what had been agreed with a broker or employer, rather than what meets a minimum legal standard, the research found.

Interviewees spoke of lack of examples of success that might inspire their pursuit of justice - no one they knew had successfully accessed a fair resolution though the legal system. A number of workers spoke of having no other options than undertaking undocumented migration to Thailand again, despite knowing the risk of being overworked, cheated or facing physical abuse.

These are some of the main findings of our new research ‘Access Unknown: Access to justice from the perspectives of Cambodian migrant workers in Thailand’, which interviewed 59 migrant workers, men and women working in seven different industries, in Thailand and after returning home. This research aimed to examine why there is still such a significant disconnect between the currently available options in the legal system and Cambodian workers’ unwillingness or inability to practically access them.

Our project employed participatory methodologies, which included capacity building for service providers, and shared findings among key stakeholders formed a platform for future collaborative work between CSOs supporting migrants in Thailand and Cambodia.

These findings come despite increased resources and efforts in recent years dedicated to improving the conditions of migrant workers and addressing trafficking in Thailand. We hope that our research can help service providers to strengthen their engagement with migrant workers by understanding the challenges, motivations and needs of migrant workers.

Read the full report here